Meet Some Rochester K-9 Police dogs!

Special Thanks to Stone Ridge Veterinary Hospital for compiling this awesome list! 


Meet Sully, 7-year partner of Officer Dan Nowack(who’s been with RPD for 29 years!).

Sully is a good working pup, but he’s had a few embarrassing moments along the way. His handler shared his favorite memory of Sully with us:

One day, during the search of a church building, Officer Nowack saw Sully climb up some stairs behind the alter. A few moments later heard a splash. The next time he saw Sully he was swimming across the baptismal pool!

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, sky, dog and outdoor

Officer Jeff Phillips and Chip! This duo has been together for 5 years of service. Chip is the only cadaver police certified K-9 in western/upstate NY. He is certified by I.P.W.D.A and assists police departments across NYS in human remains.

Officer Phillips loves working with Chip, and fondly remembers how he once helped track & locate a missing 2 year old child who became lost in a neighborhood. Thanks to Chip and the efforts of the police force, the little girl was returned safely to her home.
Thank you both for your service!

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, standing, tree, dog and outdoor

Officer Carney and K-9 Dexter(aka “Dex”) have had the privilege of working together for the last year!

When Officer Carney first brought this handsome pup home, Dex made quite the impression. Upon meeting officer Carney’s other dog, Rocky, Dex was given a test of speed. Rocky began chasing Dex around the backyard, and Dex played along. He ran and ran until finally meeting his match, and falling into the in-ground pool!
Thank you both for your service! And Dex- be careful near the pool this summer!

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, standing, dog and outdoor

Officer Jason Cropo has been working with K-9, Jack, for 3 years. Jack is a handsome pup who LOVES peanut butter and posing for candid photos in the driver’s seat of the police car.

Thank you Officer Cropo and Jack for your service!

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, standing, tree, plant, dog, flower, outdoor and nature

Sergeant Jorge Perez and K-9 Kahn! Sergeant Perez and Kahn have worked together for only 8 short months, but their bond is strong. Sergeant Perez said “Picking him up at the airport when he was brought to the U.S., we seemed to have an instant bond. Kahn has been very loving toward me and a great partner.

Thank you Sergeant Perez and Kahn for your service!

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, standing, dog, tree, outdoor and nature

Officer Jason Hess and his K-9, Kato! Officer Hess has been handling Kato for 3 years, making sure to slip him his favorite snack from time to time- baby carrots!

Officer Hess’ favorite memory with this sharp pup is when he was looking for a suspect who committed a robbery and was believed to have committed twenty others. After a long track, Kato found the suspect hiding in the bushes. We’re certainly impressed!

Thank you both for your service!

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, dog, plant, tree, table and outdoor

Pierson(aka “Piers”) is K-9 partner to Officer Mike Eaton. Officer Eaton has been working with his pup for 3 years now.

Three days after bringing Piers home as his first working dog, Officer Eaton hid his Kong toy on top of the fridge so it would be out of sight and mind. After leaving the room for a few minutes, he heard a crash. Returning to the kitchen, Officer Eaton found Piers sitting on top of the fridge with his Kong in his mouth and all of the items from the top of the fridge scattered across the floor.

Now that’s what we call determination! Thank you for your service Officer Eaton and Pierson!

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, standing, dog, tree, outdoor and nature

Last but not least!

Our last K-9 dog to feature is Tokaj! Tokaj has accompanied his handler, Officer Tim Campe, for one year. Tokaj is a handsome dog who’s great at his job, and loves his family. His favorite snack is whatever he can convince Officer Campe’s children to give him!

Officer Campe’s shared a funny story about Tokaj with us:

See More

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, people standing and outdoor
Special Thanks to Stone Ridge Veterinary Hospital for compiling this awesome list! 

4th of July Pet Safety

Lollypop Farm is Wishing your family a happy and safe 4th of July.

With fireworks, parades, picnics, and more, the Fourth of July may be a lot of fun for people, but a lot of these traditions can be scary for our furry friends. In fact, more dogs and cats go missing during this time of the year than any other. Luckily, there are things you can do to prevent your pet from becoming lost during this time of year.

  • Crowds, loud noises, and startling lights are frightening for your pets. So, it’s best to leave furry friends at home when you go to fireworks displays.
  • Never leave your pet alone outside, even for a short time, during fireworks season. Fearful animals may hurt themselves trying to escape, run away get lost in unfamiliar neighborhoods, or dart into traffic.
  • Create a safe haven at home. Make sure your pet has a place to hide if they feel the need. Hiding is a natural way for your pet to comfort themselves if they are afraid of fireworks. Playing calming music can help put your pets at ease
  • And be prepared! Make sure your pet is wearing an ID at all times and has a microchip. Even indoor cats may dart out the door if they are nervous. It’s also smart to have a good, current photo of your pet on hand.

These tips and more can help your pets have a happier Fourth of July. Learn more about how you can help your pets this fireworks season.

If your pet does go missing or if you find a pet, it’s important not to panic. Head over to the Lollypop Farm Lost and Found page for more information on how you can help reunite with your pet or what you can do if you find a lost pet. Lollypop Farm will be closed on July 4th for the holiday, but we’ll be happy to help you any way we can when we reopen July 5th. And don’t forget to post the pet on Lollypop Spottersto help spread the word throughout our community. You can also find listings of pets who have been brought to Lollypop Farm on the Lost and Found section of our website.

Have a happy and safe holiday everyone!

Screen Shot 2018-07-02 at 12.07.29 PM.png

HOT DOG…COOL BATH!

PETS IN HOT CARS: HOW YOU CAN HELP!

 

When temperatures rise, leaving pets locked in a car can be dangerous. High temperatures can cause irreparable organ damage and even death. You can take these steps to protect pets in warm weather. In the below article, you’ll learn how to help a pet left in a hot car, safety facts, and other ways you can help prevent pets from being put in harm’s way.

In the “couple minutes” that it takes to run into store a car can reach up to 120°F. Not only can this cause serious distress, but potentially permanent organ damage and even the death of a pet.

How to Help a Pet Left in a Hot Car

If you see a pet locked alone in a hot car and exhibiting signs of stress, take the following steps to help save the pet’s life:

  • Take down the car’s make, model, and license plate number. Note the time that you first noticed the pet in the car.
  • Call Lollypop Farm’s Humane Law Enforcement at (585) 223-6500 to report the pet in the car, or call 911. In New York State, it is against the law to leave a pet in a hot car.
  • Notify store managers or security guards nearby. Ask them to make an announcement to find the car’s owner and that the dog left in the car needs help.
  • Keep at a respectful distance until the pet’s owner or law enforcement arrives. Make certain that help has arrived before you leave the scene to be sure the pet is safe.
Call Lollypop Farm’s Humane Law Enforcement at 585-223-6500 or 911 to report a pet locked in a hot car.

Know Your Facts

Don’t break the window! It may be tempting to rush to rescue a pet locked in a car, but leave this to the authorities. In New York State, only law enforcement or peace officers (like Lollypop Farm’s Humane Law Enforcement) can legally take measures to remove a pet from a car. We recommend calling Lollypop Farm’s Humane Law Enforcement at (585) 223-6500 to report the pet in the car, or calling 911.

Dogs can’t sweat. Dogs and cats can’t perspire to regulate their body temperature like people do.  They can only deal with the heat by panting and through the pads of their feet. So it’s harder for pets to handle warm temperatures than for us.  Signs of a dog in distress include heavy panting, glazed eyes, excessive drooling, unsteadiness, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, or even loss of consciousness.

Cars act like an oven in warm weather. The temperature inside your car can heat up to 120° F in a matter minutes. Rolling the down windows has been shown to have little effect on the temperature inside a car. And leaving the air conditioning on and the car running doesn’t guarantee your pet’s safety—in many cars, the air system’s compressor will shut off when the engine gets too hot.

Think of alternatives to leaving your pet in the car.

  • Use the drive-through for errands when available.
  • Bring a friend who can play with your pet outside while you run your errand.
  • Shop at pet-friendly stores (Like PetSaver) and bring your pet with you!
  • Eat at an outdoor café where your pet can sit with you.
  • Leave your pet at home where it’s cool and safe.

Other Ways to Help

Take the Too Hot for Spot Pledge. Show your commitment to keeping your own pet safe.

Support Humane Law EnforcementYou can be a hero to pets left in cars with your donation to enable Lollypop Farm’s Humane Law Enforcement to respond when pets are in distress and hold owners accountable.

Spread the Word. Pass this information along to other animal lovers and help keep everyone’s pet safe. Download our Too Hot for Spot flyer or share our the Too Hot for Spot post on social media.

 

Categories: Pet Care & TrainingPet Welfare